How Pogačar represents young talent at ORMIT

How Pogačar represents young talent at ORMIT

ORMIT Belgium

ORMIT Belgium

     

Sometimes, it's not experience that makes you the best. Primož Roglič and Tadej Pogačar probably agree. The 21-year old Pogačar, riding his first Tour de France ever, beat Roglic (31) in last Saturday's time trial and took the yellow jersey home. By doing so, he became the second-youngest winner of the Tour de France ever.
At ORMIT, we see the same thing happen: young trainees with little professional experience perform surprisingly well, sometimes even better than their experienced colleagues. Why is that?

I want young talent to make  a difference in my organisation!

The combination of inexperience and motivation is often underestimated. It's a key success factor for bringing drive, a desire to win, and new perspectives to the table. Don't just look at experience, rather look at how someone thinks and works to compensate for their lack of experience.

Saying that we saw Pogačar’s win coming is not completely true. But we can’t say we’re completely surprised. Here are three similarities we noticed between the Tour de France 2020 winner and ORMIT’ers:

 

They diverge from existing paths.

Thanks to their self-confidence and open-mindedness, our young talent diverges from the existing paths and unwritten rules – simply because they don’t know these rules yet. If you’re not familiar with bike racing, here are some things you should know: You aren’t supposed to win the Tour de France without a good team. You aren’t supposed to win the Tour as a 21-year-old, in your first shot at the race. You aren’t supposed to win the Tour on the last day, stunning the whole peloton and practically the whole world. But Pogačar went on and did all of this anyway.

Expect this from an ORMIT'er once they join your team. With their curious mindset and pro-active attitude, you'll discover new ways of doing things. Forget the 'we've done this for years' arguments and get ready for change.


They are passionate

ORMIT'ers are passionate and want to make a difference. With this intrinsic motivation, they actively seek out the necessary knowledge and continuously push the limits of their abilities. When Pogačar lost time during an earlier stage, he was not worried: “we will try another day”. When almost everyone was convinced that a 57 seconds time gap would be enough for Primož Roglič to win, Pogačar didn't give up and believed it was possible until the end.

ORMIT’ers have the same drive to make a difference – not in the Tour, but in the organisations they’re working at. They are go-getters, and won’t let their inexperience stop them. Be aware of your team because the passion of these young talents is contagious.


They collect and connect the knowledge and skills of others

Precisely because of their lack of experience, young talent is good at collecting and connecting the necessary knowledge and skills to what's needed in specific projects. Understanding who to copy when has a larger impact on our performance than we think. In our fast-changing environment, our ability to learn rather than our expertise will make the difference. Knowing he didn’t have a team like Jumbo-Visma behind him, Pogačar simply shadowed them as they rode a perfect race, end-to-end, and then waited until the end to make a difference.



I want young talent to make  a difference in my organisation!